Blog Archives

酉の市

江戸の昔より『1年の無事に感謝し、来る年の幸を願う』酉の市は、11月の特定の日に神社で行われるお祭りで「お酉様」とも呼ばれます。本来は、開運・商売繁盛の神様をまつる鷲神社のお祭りでしたが、現在はその他の神社でも行われています。酉の日は11月に2回か3回あり、順に「一の酉」「二の酉」「三の酉」といいます。この日は神社の境内に、縁起物の熊手を売る店が数多く出店されます。

Torinoichi / Festival of the rooster
Torinoichi is a festival that occurs at Shinto shrines on set days in November and is also called “Honorable Rooster (Otorisama)”. Originally, it was a festival at Otori Jinja that celebrated the gods of luck and business prosperity, but now it occurs at other shrines too. Festival days occur two or three times November and are known as the “First Rooster””Second Rooster””Third Rooster”in order. On those days,lots of street stalls selling,among other things,bamboo rakes as giid luck charms are set up in the shrine compound.




重陽の節句

9月9日は五節句の一つである「重陽の節句」。またの名を「菊の節句」ともいいます。 陰陽思想では奇数は(縁起の良い)陽の数であり、陽数の最高の数が9です。このことから9月9日は、陽が重なる日であることから「重陽」と呼ばれます。
菊は不老長寿の象徴として尊ばれ、重陽の節句には、菊を飾ったり、菊酒をのんだりして、無病息災・不老長寿を祈ります。

Chrysanthemum Festival(Septebmer 9)
September 9 is known as choyo, literally double yang. Choyo is one of gosekku , the five seasonal festivals and also called as kiku no sekku , Chrysanthemum Festival. According to the yin and yang thought, odd numbers are yang, and its extremity is nine. Therefore September 9 is 9.9 and double yang, double nine.
People used to decorate chrysanthemum and drink sake floating the petal of chrysanthemum to celebrate wishing the long life.




お盆

7月13日から15日、または8月に行われる仏教行事の1つで、先祖の霊を供養するものです。このときに霊が戻ってくるといわれているため、霊が道に迷わないよう家の門口で迎え火をたいたり、室内にちょうちんをともしたりするほか、仏壇をきれいにし、野菜や果物などの供物を飾ります。
そして盆が終わると霊を送り返します。これを精霊送りといい、送り火を門口でたき、供物を川や海に流します。

Bon Festival
Bon Festival is a Buddhist event occurring from the 13th to 15th of July or August to hold a memorial service for the spirits of ancestors. Because the spirits of the dead are said to return at this time, fires are lit at the entrances to homes so the spirits do not lose their way, and , in addition to lanterns being lit inside homes, the Buddhist home alters are tidied up and vegetables fruit are set out as offerings.
And when bon is over, the spirits are sent on their way. This is called the escorting of the spirits and fires to send them on their way are lit at entrances of homes and offerings are floated on rivers and the ocean.




七夕

七夕は7月7日の夜、天の川に隔てられている牽牛星と織女星が、天帝の許しを得て年に一度会えるという中国の伝説からはじまった星を司る年中行事です。 もとは朝廷の貴族の間で行われていた祭でしたが、江戸時代から一般庶民の間に定着しました。6日の夜には、色とりどりの短冊に願い事を書いたり、歌を書いたりして笹につるし、7日の夜に庭先にだします。

Tanabata(July 7)
Tanabata is the Star Festival that occurs on July 7. It is based on the legend in which Altair and Vega, who are split apart on opposite sides of the Milky Way, are allowed to meet once a year on this night by the Emperor of the universe. Originally a festival carried out among the Court nobility, it has since the Edo Period become established among the people at large. On the night of the 6th, people write their wishes or poems on strips of poetry paper of various colors and hang them on bamboo grass; then, on the night of the 7th, they put them out in the garden.




端午の節句/こどもの日

5月5日は男の子の成長を祝う「端午の節句」です。この日は「こどもの日」として国民の祝日にもなっています。男の子のいる家庭では武者や英雄を模した五月人形を飾ったり、屋外にこいのぼりをたてたり、菖蒲やかしわもちを供えたりすることで、その子の立身出世を祈ります。
端午の節句は、古くは災厄を避けるために、菖蒲等の薬草や鳥獣を捕る薬猟の日でした。
室町時代から、紙製のかぶとに菖蒲の花を飾るようになり、江戸時代になって、武者人形やこいのぼりが登場。広く定着したのは明治時代にはいってからです。

Tango no Sekku
May 5 is a day for boys. Long the Tango no Sekku, it has been officially renamed Children’s Day and made a national holiday. Families with sons buy armored samurai dolls and miniature helmets, hang out koi-nobori, buy irises and kashiwa-mochi, and pray for their sons’ success in life.
Tango no Sekku used to be a day for hunting game and gathering medicinal herbs, such as iris leaves. Shobu in Japanese, the iris has a homonym meaning “military spirit”, from whence came the Muromachi custom of decorating paper helmets with iris leaves.
Samurai dolls and koi-nobori first appeared in the Edo period, but it was not until the Meiji period that these customs became popular nationwide.




お花見

美しく咲いた桜を観賞し楽しむため公園などに出かけることを花見といいます。日本では、3月・4月に桜の花が満開になると、家族や職場の仲間、友人などと一緒に花見をする習慣があります。 桜の木の下にござなどを敷いて酒を飲んだり食事をしたりして春の到来を楽しみます。

Hanami(Flower-viewing)
Hanami is going out to places such as parks to appreciate and enjoy leisurely the beautiful blooming cherry blossoms. The custom in Japan, in March and April when the cherry blossoms are full bloom, is to do hanami with family,colleagues from work, or friends. People spread a mat under cherry blossoms, drink sake, eat foods,and enjoy the coming of spring.




ひな祭り/桃の節句

ひな祭りは、3月3日、女の子の健やかな成長や幸福を願う行事で、桃の節句とも呼ばれます。女の子のいる家庭の多くはひな人形を飾り、桃の花やひなあられ、菱餅、白酒などをひな人形に備えます。 昔は紙で簡単なひな人形を作り、3月3日に川に流していましたが、やがて現在のようなひな人形を飾るようになりました。
ひな祭りの起源は、身の穢れや災いを人形に移し、川に流して厄払いしたという古代の風習にあります。これが、女の子の人形遊び(ひな遊び)と結びつき、江戸時代からは現在に近い形の「ひな祭り」としてとり行われるようになりました。

Hinamatsuri
Hinamatsuri (the Girl’s Festival) ,occurs on March 3 , is a celebration for families with young girls to pray for their good health and happiness. It is also known as momo no sekku (the Peach Festival). Most homes with girls display dolls for the Doll’s Festival and dedicate to them peach blossoms, rice cake cubes, special coloured and diamond-shaped rice cakes,white sake,and other items.
The origin of hinamatsuri is an ancient practice in which the sin of the body and misfortune are transferred to a doll and washed away by setting the doll in a river to drift away. When this practice spread to Japan, it was linked to girl’s playing with dolls and, in the Edo Period, was developed into the hinamatsuri.




節分

節分とはもともと、「季節の分かれ目」を意味していました。現在では特に、立春の前日である2月3日がこれに当たり、この日の夜、煎った大豆を家の内外にまきながら「鬼は外!福は内!」と唱え「豆まき」をおこないます。
その年の健康・無病息災を祈り、大豆を年の数だけ食べるという習慣もあります。 神社でも大掛かりな豆まきが実施されます。

Setsubun(The eve of the first day of spring)
Setsubun actually signifies the parting of the seasons; especially nowadays it falls on about February 3 , the day before the first day of spring. On the evening of this day, people yell,”Out with the ogre(demon)! In with the happiness!” while scattering parched soy beans inside and outside their homes.
To pray for good health for the year, there is also the custom of eating only the same number of soy beans(called fukumame) as one’s age. At temples and shrines,too,bean scattering is practiced on a grand scale.

■やいかがし
節分の夜、家の戸口に、イワシの頭、柊の葉を飾る習慣があります。これは、イワシの臭いと柊の葉のとげで鬼を追い払うという意味をもっています。
Yaikagashi
On the night of setsubun,the head of a sardine and leaves of holly are displayed at the entrance of houses. It is a charm to drive away the demon with the smell of the sardine and the spiky leaves of the holly.




鏡開き

1月11日に鏡餅を割って、お雑煮やお汁粉にして食べます。11日にもなると、鏡餅は固くひび割れてきますが、縁起物なので刃物で「切る」ことを酒、手や槌でたたいて割ります。

Kagami biraki
Kagami-biraki is an event that occurs on January 11 to split open the kagami-mochi and make zoni or shiruko(azuki bean soup) with it. By the 11th, kagami-mochi hardens and cracks,but, since it is a good luck charm, “cutting” it with a sharp edge is avoided and it is split by hand or with a hammer.




七草粥/人日の節句

1月7日(人日の節句)の朝に、セリやセズナなど「春の七草」をいれてたいたお粥「七草粥」を食べ、1年の健康(無病息災)を祈願します。

Nanakusa-gayu(Seven-herb rice porridge)
On the morning of January 7, kayu(rice porridge) with the seven spring herbs, such as Japanese parsley and shepherd’s purse, are eaten as a custom to pray for the health in the year.